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correspondent jim acosta. jim, what are we expecting the president to say here? >> i think the president is going to back up secretary john kerry and other officials, including jay carney earlier this afternoon, that any moves by russia to intervene in the crisis to perhaps invade that territory of crimea would be a grave mistake, in the words of white house officials and according to secretary of state john kerry. one thing that we've been pressing officials all day long, jake, is exactly who those forces are in the crimea area. we're seeing forces with insignias that appear to be blackandover or concealed. it's not clear who is on the ground in crimea. hopefully we'll get updated information from the president as to what that is. jake, make no mistake, this is, again, once again, another confrontation between the president and vladimir putin over what is happening. those events on the ground in the ukraine. >> let's bring in chief national correspondent jim sciutto. i was e-mailing with a senior official who points out that the russians have a base and the question is whether what they
and new details about putin's conversation with president obama. senior white house correspondent jim akosta joins me now with details about that call. jim, what do you know? >> reporter: first thing to point out before i detail that phone call, we're getting word that the president is at a local fund-raiser in the washington, d.c. and told people at the fund-raiser that we may be able to deescalate this crisis in his words. the u.s. may be able to deescalate the crisis in the coming days so interesting to hear the president using the words, perhaps a hopeful sign about the way the white house feels about what's happening in ukraine at this point. but getting to that phone call, yes, as we all know it took place on saturday. 90 minutes long and according to a senior administration official briefing reporters on that phone call earlier this evening, the president and vladimir putin spent much of that time during that phone call debating the facts on the ground with respect to what's happening on the ground in ukraine. russian president basically saying that he's trying to defend the ri
reports. jim reid fought overseas, only to face a battle at home. >> it kind of made me question, you know, myself a little bit, first time in a long time that i had to do that. >> pelley: mark strassman on vets fighting for jobs. and a couple unearth millions in gold coins but will the government let them cash in? bill whitaker reports. >> this is buried treasure, sothing we all fant sights about. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. a few words today from russian president putin seemed to ease world tension overs ukraine, least temporarily, and at least enough for the financial markets to recover. after taking control of ukraine's crimea region, putin said russia has no swengz of fighting the ukrainian people or annexing crimea, but he reserved the right to use force to protect ethnic russians who live in eastern ukraine. in kiev today, the ukrainian captain, secretary of state john kerry honored protesters killed last month. those protesters drove ukraine's pro-moscow president viktor yanukovych from power, and that is wh
. let's bring in with our national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> wolf, officials are attempting to de-escalate the crisis and avoiding any moves that may further inflame the situation. does russia expand its military intervention or does it pull back? on the ground in ukraine, there's a volatile mix of armed forces and emotions, which we saw flair up today. today in crimea, russian and ukrainian forces in a dramatic and dangerous standoff. weapons drawn and here a threat to open fire. >> i said stop! i'm serious. i'll shoot at your legs. >> reporter: and as secretary of state john kerry arrived in the ukrainian capital of kiev, a war of words. russian president vladimir putin and secretary kerry trading die metric clee opposed views of the crisis. back and forth. >> translator: the acting president, of course, is not legitimate. >> the elected representatives of the people of ukraine, they overwhelmingly approve the new government. >> reporter: and back and forth. >> translator: citizens of ukraine, both russian and ukrainian, what worries them? they are worried a
their pierce. >> jim capretta, what do you think the president is doing or not doing to close the gap? >> i think the budget is aimed at a political statement, not a legislative change. i don't think there is a chance the many proposals will be enacted. it's a political argument the democrats can carry into the november election. the white house all be admitted that's their aim with this kind of budget. back to the issue of inequality. there is a misunderstanding of how inequality came about and whether or not it affects people on the low end. inequality happened because we have a global economy and if someone finds a new idea or research effort or something that's innovative, you can do very, very well in this country if you're a part of that. does that come at the expense of people at the low end? no. there have been many, many economic studies that have shown that just because somebody at the high end is doing better that doesn't come at the expense of the low end. so the president's proposal is really a prescription for the wrong problem. secondly, even if it was the right problem, the
with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way for this entire situation to find the road to deescalation. >> reporter: russian and ukrainian officials, however, did not meet. >> why didn't you meet lavrov today? >> reporter: but as the diplomats talk or don
on the tightrope of diplomacy. jim maceda joins us. >> reporter: what a difference a day makes really. putin's comments on tuesday that he had no desire to annex the crimea peninsula, to take a step back from the brink. even though crimea remains tense on the ground today there's a new report of russians seizing two ukrainian anti-missile posts. still it feels like ukraine is spinning not towards war today but some kind of diplomatic solution. for instance, after secretary of state john kerry's visit to kiev yesterday, where he did show support for that new pro-western government with very strong words against vladimir putin and a promise of a billion dollars in loans, today kerry meets for the very first time since the current crisis escalated with his russian counterpart to talk exit strategy. more significantly, the ukrainian and russian governments are talking on a cabinet level today for the first time. and then there's a russian defense official discussing ukraine with nato members in brussels as well. of course, there's only one man who can make or break any deal. that's vladimir puti
and jim pinkerton with the best location of the day in sunny, miami, florida. good to see you. >> good to be with you. >> joe, i have to start with you. white house press secretary jay carney doubled down on this and said also this week, those stories, a lot of them turned out not to be true. is that a winning argument for the democrats? because there are millions of people waiting to tell their stories and they're not flattering. >> well, i think what -- what reed was talking about, i think, and what jay carney were talking about is a lot of the ads that were being played. most of them made for americans by process tearty to have a ton of problems with the stories they are telling. they did this thing where they showed people receiving cancellations on their policies. it turned out those were paid actors pretending that their policies had been canceled. one woman who said her premiums had gone up, back checkers gave that one pinocchio because her premiums have gone down. there's tons of problems with the ads being run out there across the country. >> that aside, harry reid did not, to
'll have more on what organizing for action chief jim messina has now told his team. >>> good morning from washington. it's tuesday, march 4th, 2014. this is "the daily rundown." >>> first reads of the morning, russian president vladimir putin went before the media this morning to defend his country's actions in the wake of the ukrainian revolution, arguing that it amounted to a coup that demanded a russian response. he he told reporters he would use force in ukraine only as a last resort, he claimed. but he said he reserves the right to do so. putin also said further military action would be justified because the ousted president, victor yanukovych has requested it. he said anything russia does would be to protect the citizens of ukraine. and he even told reporters that the soldiers currently in crimea, they're not russian soldiers at all. he called them local forces. now, responding to the united states, the russian leader shrugged off threats of diplomatic or economic punishments. meanwhile, president obama said monday that russia has a choice. >> over time, this will be a costly propos
at this hour. elise labott joins us and michael holmes and our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, joins us from washington. >>> first, elise, i want to speak with you. i understand john kerry has already had a brief meeting with the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov. they have had a somewhat decent relationship in the past. they are set to have a one-on-one meeting any minute now. what's the realistic goal of this meeting? >> reporter: the goal, john, is really to get russian prime minister, lavrov, to sit down with the ukrainian foreign minister. that minister flew on secretary kerry's plane last night with us from kiev to paris. he says he is really eager to sit down with the russian foreign minister. that's what all this diplomacy is about today, trying to give russia that diplomatic off ramp. they want russia and ukraine to sit down, have a dialogue along with the u.s., u.k., france, germany, members of the international community with an interest. they want to get monitors on the ground in ukraine acknowledging that russia does have these concerns in ukraine, p
back then and standing outside the hospital for days and the fight that jim has made for his life. and we see all of the victims, newtown and no matter how many victims there are of gun violence, there's such political resistance to closing loopholes. >> the encouraging thing that the american public is behind us. it's about closing that extraordinary disconnect that exists between what the american public wants and what the elected leaders are doing about it. we take tremendous inspiration from what sara and our predecessors at the brady campaign accomplished. this brady law has been tremendously effective. we've prevented 2.1 million prohibited purchasers from purchasing guns. that's 48 domestic abusers every day that have been prohibited. it's a question of building on that success and looking at what it takes to accomplish that success. it doesn't happen overnight and we can take inspiration from the fight that sara led around the original brady law there. >> i was covering congress at the time, i remember. >> we have to stay the course and it's about making the voice heard an
at the military might of ukraine and russia, we'll have an international security analyst jim walsh, at the bottom of the hour, at 6:30. there's more online at aljazeera.com. we have a live blog updating the crisis in ukraine. still ahead on aljazeera.com. it's two days before fat tuesday. we'll head live to new orleans for mardi gras. plus... >> i'm stand -- stephanie stanton, the rain storms in california are on the way out. was it enough to dent the drought. >> and dreams coming true - we head to the red carpet as oscar gets ready to steal the limelight tonight. >> welcome back. after months of drought california has seen a lot of rain. it's still not enough to ease the dry spell. stephanie stanton has more. >> it is welcome rain here in this community, an hour north of the los angeles. anywhere between 1-6 inches fell. meteorologists say it's nowhere near enough to break the drought that has been plaguing california in recent years. >> a large area is at 5-25% of normal, even after the rain fall week. it puts it in perspective, and the entire area is below 50% of normal. >> the terrible thing
$1 billion in loan guarantees to ukraine. i'm going to turn to senior white house correspondent jim acosta. so, jim, you have both the secretary of state and president obama expressing a lot of support for ukraine today and the administration seemed to offer president putin perhaps a way out of this crisis. >> that's right, brianna. i think that's what the president and the administration has been saying all along through this, that there are these off-ramps for vladimir putin if he wants to bring in international observers to deal with some of these questions that he has about the safety of ethnic russians, which by the way the administration rejects, then bring in international observers. i will tell you we just came out of what was supposed to be a budget briefing and as you know the president was making those remarks earlier at a budget event. it just shows you how much ukraine and the events are dominating everything right now. i had a chance to ask white house press secretary jay carney about vladimir putin's claim that those are not russian troops in crimea and jay carney sai
anniversary of the brady handgun violence prevention act. forcontrol advocates pass expanded prevention. jim brady was shot in the head during an assassination attempt on reagan and 1981. sarah brady is the founder of the brady foundation. she is the police chief of baltimore and gun violence victims were at the spent today. >> good morning. welcome. i am the president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. we are very clear to be here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the brady law and to release our new report. before we get to those things, we want to begin by showing why we're all here. why our mission is so vitally important and why we cannot ever give up. >> good morning. my name is kenny barnes. i live in washington dc. i'm a victim of senseless gun violence. this is a picture of my son. he was killed september 24, 2001. right here in washington, d.c. on the corner of 11th and u stre et northwest. >> good morning. my name is eddie. , my mother was shot to death in front of me. the gun was also turned on me. it malfunctioned. i am here today along with other victims and su
, and lifts. although jim says it is a version of the adult classes, it is not too dangerous or too much for the little ones. >> it is a high repetition of a weight they can handle which starts to get into the card owe side. it is functional movements. they learn how to use their body as efficiently as possible. >> i first heard about cross fit and tried it, i'm thinking this exercising is a lot of work but it's really fun. >> the american academy of pediatrics says research shows it is safe for kids to start light weight lifting at age eight. some doctors disagree. they say kids bones, muscles and tendons are still maturing and they may be pushing their bodies too hard. >> well, they are up off the couch. >> that's true. >>> now for a look at what's i had on the cbs evening news. >> -- ahead on the cbs evening news. >> scott pelly is in new york. >> we're going to be covering the super power crisis after crimea putin talked to today after what's next. elizabeth palmer is covering the russian invasion. david martin will have new details on today's missile watch. >>> plus, gm's chief has
just 12 were allowed through to their posts. nbc news foreign correspondent, jim maceda is live for us now in moscow. let's look ahead to secretary kerry's meeting in paris. any hope of progress or is this just more posturing from both sides? >> reporter: hi, thomas. well, i think you can feel a sea of change in the past 24 hours. you cited some of putin's comments yesterday. some of them troubling, no doubt. he also said he saw no need for use of force in ukraine and had no desire to annex the crimea peninsula, really allowing that cold war style military confrontation that we've been reporting on to take a step back from the brink. we've seen that in the reaction of the world stock markets already. and even though rhymea remaicri very tense on the ground, those pictures prove that, even a report of russians seizing two more crimean anti-missile posts, the perception is that ukraine is spinning not toward war but some kind of diplomatic solution. secretary of state meeting with count counterpart sergey lavrov. this is the first time since the current crisis escalated that they've had
this that is unrelated. you heard jim talk about the un envoy sent to crimea. that was threatened and not kidnapped. he is now safe and preparing to leave ukraine. several armed men threatened special envoy robert sari. they blocked him at a coffee shop. break this down for us. what happened and what kind of threat was this? how did he escape the coffee shop? >> we heard jim saying someone will get hurt. this un envoy has his diplomatic mission cut short in crimea. it just arrived. he visited a naval base and was leaving when armed men, 10 to 15 in number, not everyone with weapons surrounded him and demanded he leave crimea immediately and go to the airport. he got into the car he came with and refused to get out and the men blocked the car. they then were threatening him. he was described as shaken and not physically hurt. he walk and sought refuge. the late news is that the united nations is saying they are taking a late flight out and will return shortly to kiev to continue his mission. cut short by today's incident, the words of the united nation spokesman office here in new york. secretary genera
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
traders are jim urio and anthony grisante in new york. jim, i will start with you. what's your best trade given what we have seen and the moves we've seen already in some of those commodities? >> i think it's oil. remember this. even if people are saying buy the dip and this situation will come to some sort of settlement in the next couple days, markets don't forget immediately what drove them to that spot. the market move can sometimes take a lifetime of its own. i think crude's up to 108, 110 because the market will remember oh, yeah, there's geopolitical risk and it's hard to be short crude. i expect that to be the best trade. >> anthony, do you agree? is there a trade higher on the list for you? >> i agree with jim only because oil was strong even before any of this started. there is high demand for our products not only in the u.s. but around the world. that can be affected. but the trade i'm looking at is gold. i think it's gotten a little ahead of itself. i really don't think in my opinion that we are going to see all out war here. gold getting good resistance. i'm looking to actua
on ukraine. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent, jim acosta. jim, the white house says it won't be sending a presidential delegation to the paralympic games in sochi, russia that, are about to begin. is this more boy costs? it looks like the g-8 summit in june the u.s. was planning on participating in, that may be gone, as well. >> reporter: that's right. and you heard secretary of state john kerry say, wolf, it may become the g-7. that russia may be expelled. want to pick up on something you were talking about with anderson cooper about that alleged ultimatum from russia to ukrainian forces about crimea. there is a state department conference call going on right now, wolf, and a state department spokeswoman, jen psaki, said they don't have any independent confirmation that ultimate yum has been issued. but if that had occurred, it would in their view constitute a dangerous escalation. so that quick response from the white house to those events, even though the russians are saying that that did not occur. you mentioned the word from the white house earlier this morning that, y
right, ian williams, thank you for that report. >>> let's turn now to russia where nbc's jim maceda joins us from moscow. what's the latest from there, jim, particularly in the wake of the news conference that putin held yesterday? >> reporter: hi, kristen. well, from the -- certainly from this perch here, it does feel like a flurry of diplomacy in the past 24 hours. the chances of avoiding war in the ukraine seems to be getting a boost, particularly from putin's comments yesterday, tuesday, that he saw no need to use force in ukraine and had no desire to annex the crimean peninsula. those two comments really allowed the military confrontation that we've been reporting on to take a step b k back. and even though, as ian reports, crimea remains tense on the ground today with a new report that russians had seized two ukrainian anti-missile posts, the perception still is that ukraine is spinning now not towards war, but towards some kind of diplomatic solution. secretary of state john kerry's meeting with sergey lavrov, for instance, starting in paris in less than an hour, is their fi
lingering fears they will not stop there. jim maceda joins us live from moscow with more on the diplomatic efforts under way. jim, what's the latest? >> reporter: hi, there, tamron, well, that meeting you referred to was indeed brief, kerry did urge lavrov to have direct talks. that seems to be an important theme now, unifying this swirl of activity. it was their first face-to-face since the ukraine crisis escalated. that is just one example of this, again, this flurry happening over the past 24 hours, tamron, the chances of avoiding war in ukraine seem to have gotten a boost from vladimir putin's comments. yesterday if you recall, he said he saw no need for the use of force in ukraine, had no desire to annex the crimean peninsula, and really that's a sigh of relief has been resinating in the international financial markets, including here in russia in moscow after historic drops on monday. that's just one example. the perception today, tamron, is that ukraine is spinning now not towards war, but some kind of diplomatic solution. in addition to kerry/lavrov meetings, more importantly, you'
to this ukraine crisis. our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, monitoring what's going on. and, you know, these diplomats, u.n. envoy basically held there. it getting ugly. but maybe lavrov and kerry, they do have a personal relationship that goes way back. maybe they can come up with something. >> they do. relationship that helped with that chemical weapons deal in certi syria. you look at the incident with the u.n. envoy and other skirmishes. you remember yesterday we saw ukrainian and russian soldiers go nose to nose and shots fired in the air. this is why you need diplomacy now. you need the sides talking to each other, to deescalate. because you have a very volatile mix of guys with guns on the ground there, and emotions that have been stoked up by russian propaganda. and remember, these gangs, these ununiformed gangs, kind of pro-russian militias, there is a russian hand in that. that's a tool of russian power on the ground there. this is not happening by accident. those guys coming together. and you know, we've talked about this before. once you get that genie out of the
is going to lose, the russian people are going to lose. >> jim maceda joins us from moscow. a "new york times" article quotes angela merkel having had a telephone conversation with vladimir putin saying she's not sure he is in touch with reality and he is in another world. what does this mean for an escalation of the situation here, do you think? >> what it means is we don't know what will happen next because we can't really anticipate what putin will do. putin is a product of the cold war. for him, no matter how you try to convince him otherwise, anything west of ukraine is enemy territory for him. and he in his own mind is seeing nato creeping up ever so closer -- or closely to his boarders. now, you mentioned secretary kerry going to kiev. that hopefully will calm the waters a little bit, at least keep kiev from doing something unintentionally or that unintentionally as ka lates the situation. but it is now true that the west has mobilized at least diplomatically against vladimir putin's military takeover of crimea. as you say, it's not firmly in his hands. that it's really, julia, u
's political and economic crisis? cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto explains. >> reporter: there's a lot of questions about russia's interest in the ukraine as well as the west. first a reminder here. ukraine is in europe not a million miles away, the capital few municipal-bond miles away that americans travel to all the time, paris, london, rome. western border key u.s. aslice, slovakia, hungary and romania, poland. ukraine not a member of nato but there's been talk about bringing them in. let's get a better sense of russia's interest there. you look at crimea. on the tip of that peninsula, the sevastopol military headquarters. access to the black sea, mediterranean, atlantic, essential for russia and first place that many of those 6,000 and even more russian troops went when they crossed the border from russia into crimea. sovereign ukrainian territory. let's look inside the country as well because there's a split. western part of the country here liens towards europe, 5% of the population in these parts speak ethnic russian. eastern part 75% here speak russian, ethnic f
to the base where it belongs and the only place it is authorized to be. chief national security court jim sciutto joins us from new york. jim, what are the options for the united states and what are the interests that signify that the u.s. should be involved? >> lets start with options first. secretary kerry was actually very explicit, more explicit than any administration officials have been so far in public about what is on the payable here. we heard in the last couple of days this idea of not going to sochi g-8 conference but kerry went further. he said for one, mentioned the possibility of expelling russia from g-8 entirely. that's a bigger step than just not showing up at their conference in sochi. that's a big step on the table. he also mentioned asset freezes of russian businesses and banks. this is interesting. senator bob corker, republican senator discussing measures considered on capitol hill. he mentioned this kind of thing, too, sanctioning russianentities and individuals. remember, russian businesses do a lot of business through the international financial markets, concentra
national correspondent jim ingle reports it has a lot to do with this fall's elections. >> president obama's steadily delaying and dismantling his own health care law as he prepares to offer another delay in obamacare, one to postpone the political pain of cancelling millions of plans in the individual market just like last fall. >> they're going to get cancellation notices again sometime around october 1 or slightly before, and the same political issue that erupted last year would erupt again in 2014 right before the election. >> it's just getting past the 2014 elections, and it's unfortunate, but i think it means that some of his candidates in the senate are in trouble. >> at the end of last year, some 6 million people on the individual market were told their policies were canceled and forced into obamacare often with more expensive policies. having promised that people could keep their plans and doctors no matter what, the president tried to apologize. >> there's no doubt that the way i put that forward unequivocally ended up not being accurate. >> then he urged insurers and state insur
national security reporter jim sciutto is in washington. could this threat of seizing assets, could that deter the u.s. or eu from less viaing sanctions? >> reporter: it shows how quickly this could spiral into a tit for tat or unupmanship. right now they just target individuals, government officials involved in the decision to send troops into sovereign ukrainian territory. if the russians were to follow through on next step much seizing assets, you know, you have another option for the u.s. which has been discussed and brought up by republican senators, bob corker and others of sanctioning russian entities, meaning state banks, oil companies, energy companies, and that's when you start talking about real money. russia's trade, russia's very economy is dependent on access to the international finance system, its trade with europe. again europe lose as lot and that's why you're seeing opposition from the germans and british and others to more significant sanctions that have already been put on the table by the u.s. >> jim, educate our viewers. how common is it for a country that has
-800-345-2550 of your trading. >>> situation in ukraine and russia tense, jim maceda is live in moscow with the latest. hi, jim. >> reporter: the big event today was putin's command performance, hour and a half press conference that he gave here in moscow, putin called the military intervention in crimea extraordinary but legitimate. i think his key comment came when he asked about what happens next. he said he didn't think the use of force was necessary at this time in crimea or elsewhere in ukraine leaving open the possibility of force but only as a last resort. now, that signal i think coupled with images of russian forces returning to their bases after putin announced the end of the war games along ukraine's border with russia, the two signals, carl, could really lower the temperature in the standoff that, of course, has become increasingly tense. meanwhile as the u.s. and its allies struggle to come up with an effective package of sanctions, putin addressed the sanctions issue as well warning the west and i must say in a calm and unthreatening tone in today's interconnected world sanctions can eq
on ukraine. joining us now for a discussion of the coverage, jim pinkerton, contributing writer for the americany go zone and alan colmes, host of the alan colmes show, also a fox news contributor. let's get it underway, gentlemen. here is what that "the washington post" editorial says in its opening paragraph. for five years, president obama has led a foreign policy based more on how he thinks the world should operate than on reality. it was a world in which the tide of water is receding, quoting a president there, and the united states could, without much risk, radically reduce the size of its armed forces. other leaders in the vision would behave rationally and in the interest of their people and the world. invasions, brute force, great power, gains and shifting alliances. these were things of the past. so jim, the media are coming to a different point of view now? >> i think some are. "new york times" asked if obama tough enough and the "usa today" called it response late and lame, unquote. i th media, not unlike what happened with jimmy carter in the late 1970's when the ne
forces military, civilian and, of course, our afghan colleagues that continue despite every day, jim, thank you very much. alex and i were saying he gave his keynote address and a what are the rest of us supposed to say? andrew asked if i would talk about reconciliation, elections and a very important topic i think, the politics of the future relationship of between afghanistan and pakistan. i would be pleased to do that but before i do, i just wanted to step back just for a moment really and make three points and asked one question. i think it's relevant to the entire conversation we're going to have today. first point, that's the one that has been emphasized here both in the fields that we saw previously and ambassador dobbins speech and the points that intimate. it's really important it seems to me when we talk about afghanistan to stop just for a moment and recognize what has been achieved. not just what has been achieved but what has been achieved at such great cost on the part of afghans, part of the united states military and civilian, and, of course, our international partner
this an invasion. what exactly are nato officials considering there? >> hi, jim. earlier today the nato secretary general gave a brief statement to the media in which he called on russia to deescalate tensions. take a listen to what he had to say. >> what russia is doing now in ukraine, violates the principles of the united nations charter. it threatens peace and security in europe. russia must stop its military activities and its threats. today we will discuss their implications for european peace and security and for nato's relationship with russia. >> now there are two meetings taking place today here at nato headquarters. the first meeting, a meeting of the north atlantic council. that's the primary decision making body for nato. that meeting we understand is still under way. that will be followed by a meeting by the nato ukraine commission. that meeting taking place at the behest of ukrainian officials. the commission was formed in 1997 with the aim of strengthening military inside the ukraine as well as improving ties between kiev and western europe. now many people see the involvement of n
. here's nbc's jim maceda who has more from moscow. >> reporter: putin now has his hand on the russian crown jewel. crimea gives putin an essential warm water port, and it counters in his mind the nightmare scenario. that's what he sees as an ultranationalist government suddenly cancelling russia's lease on the black see base and kiev taking control of crimea and then joining nato down the line, bringing the enemy, in his mind, right back to russia's doorstep. so vladimir putin has made that calculus, and it's now unclear just what the west can do about it. chuck, back to you. >> thank you, jim. right now, according to folks i've talked to, the u.s. has three options, none of them involve the u.s. military. the first, the u.s. could move along with european allies to officially suspend or kick russia out of the g8. that would be symbolic. second, the administration could pursue its own sanctions that target russian banks as well as international sanctions, targeting russian oil companies. third, the u.s. may convince the european union to cancel some of its energy contracts with russia
more widespread outages by the end of the day. jim cantore has the latest for us from washington, d.c. >> reporter: how about this, winter's just cranking it out here. we've seen our temperature go from 37 degrees down to 17 degrees, so we've dropped 20 degrees since midnight. 20 degrees. of course, if you think about what happened to the roads yesterday around 50, now we refreeze them and you have a solid cake sitting on these road surfaces. cars are moving, because it's pretty flat, but once you start getting on a hill or two, in and around washington and baltimore, it gets ugly. i'll tell you, if we can get this stuff up by about 2:00 this afternoon once this precipitation begins to taper off, we're going to make headway on the roads. tonight again, single digit temperatures. the normal high for the day is 51 degrees in washington. the normal low is 34. we will start tomorrow at 9 and maybe, maybe get to 31 for a high. we won't even touch our normal low temperature tomorrow, so very, very cold there with whatever's melted underneath is going to cause problems. so far looks like w
not even remain in the g-8. >> we go directly to nbc's jim maceda in moscow. jim, what are we to make of president putin's actions here? >> reporter: hi, eric. so far, it's playing out very much along the old soviet playbook, isn't it? you have russia asked to intervene in crimea by russian compatriots under threat. putin had got the use of force and 24 hours later, russian forces have pretty much neutralized crimea without firing a shot. so he's already attained his key short-term goal, anyhow, and i think that's reminding kiev and reminding the west that vladimir putin can't be cut out of ukraine's future. and that he truly is prepared to use his facility anywhere in ukraine, if used to defend his interests. and that doesn't seem to worry him at all, this idea of consequences, for him not going or going to the g-8 or whoever comes to the g-8 doesn't seem to be a big issue. his larger goal, analysts tell us, is to bring ukraine into a kind of soviet economic union, something that would rival the eu. okay, that doesn't look very likely now that kiev is going pro-west, but they say put
burning up the phone lines lately. >> the diplomacy continuing full speed ahead. let's hope it works. jim acosta at the white house, thank you. >>> let's go to paris, our foreign affairs reporter elise lavin is there. intense meetings today. the secretary said he'd rather be where all of the action is right now as far as the diplomacy is concerned. did you get the sense that there's any ground for serious optimism right now? >> wolf, i would say cautious optimism. they didn't get that meeting between russian foreign minister lav love and the ukrainian foreign, they've been trying to get together all day kerry met with lavrov. then they sat down together. you had that call between angela merkel in which she's pitching this german/french plan that has some elements that the russians would like. tomorrow secretary kerry will go to rome and meet with foreign minister lavrov again. you have a seedling, if you will, of a diplomatic process. and everyone wants to de-escalate the situation. but i will say, wolf, the state department just sent out a fax sheet and it's called president putin's fict
. senator, thank you very much for joining us today. as you know from our own jim miklaszewski and interviews with martin dempsey, the joint chiefs chairman and what the president has said to karzai, we are not going to wait for anything further from him, we have given up on him. so what happens if we end up withdrawing all troops from afghanistan? >> it could be a problem. i mean, in terms of just the security in afghanistan, the troops there, their forces have improved a great deal. they are miles ahead of where they were just a few years ago, but are they going to be able to resist a kind of hit-and-run guerilla war by the taliban. and the other issue is counter terrorism and what our basis is there. this is a real problem and the president is doing a real thing by calling karzai's bluff. he left the door open, though, there's a presidential election coming up in a couple months, and the new president might be ready to sign this thing. the irony is they had this convention of the whole leadership of the whole country, and they said yes to the whole deal. and now karzai, i do
that codified regulation that recalls back to the worst excesses of jim crow. >> it's not the first time arizona has gotten into an issue here with the n.f.l. the n.f.l. did take a position back in 1993 the n.f.l. pulled the super bowl out of address because it refused to recognize martin luther king jr. day and that was quick. it was only a matter of hours after the vote that this commissioner paul tagligu decided no the to do that is romminger goodell amend today's n.f.l. just not as strong as the n.f.l. was back then? >> it's interesting. paul taglibu was a commissioner who had a record of trying to do the right thing even if it was not in the best interest of ownership. if you look at all of roger goodell's decisions, it's about disciplining players and never about disciplining ownership. this would have been one of those cases where it would have hurt the bottom line of the n.f.l. if they tried to pull a move off like this because the event you mentioned, paul taglibu said we will pull the super bowl. he announced that in 90. they said we will celebrate martin luther king's holiday and tagl
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
. the multi million dollar profollow owe she manages with jim cramer. >> investors on edge, and they are selling stocks as the conflict with ukraine and russia escalates. is there anything the u.s. can do? >> warren buffet speaks. what does the world's famous investor think? we talk to him about that, the economy and more. >> winter storms kept car shoppers at home for the second straight month. will deal es offer
of democratic presidents. >> host: jim said we had a lot of roads repaid for. and ron says, $25 trillion in debt by 2024 what does the president's budget say about the deficit? >> guest: that is true the debt is at around $25 trillion in 2024 but that is irrelevant because the economy will grow significantly between now and then. the absolute level of the debt is irrelevant. we have a larger debt than smaller countries. you would not compare to debt to a hundred years ago so that is irrelevant. the percentage of the debt relative to the size of the economy because that shows how much we are in debted. the president says 69% of the economy would be this. and that is a decline from today. the good news is we have smaller deficits and the economy is growing, but that is still bad when over the past 40-50 years it has been around 40%. not good in historical terms, but in history. the big problem is when the baby boomers are going to retire, the debt is going to rise because of the drains on social security and medicare. the problem isn't over as a person on twitter points out. but the progress of th
correspondent jim sciutto. there's so many policies and cultures. it seems far away but it isn't. >> ukraine is in europe, kiev is miles away from rome, paris, london, that kind of thing and we have u.s. allies just to the west, poland, slovakia, hungary, romania. the u.s. is required to defend these countries militarily if they come under threat. >> crimea, appropriately colored red. why? >> because it has that pull toward russia. russia, right on the tip of russia, it's the headquarters of their black sea fleet, their on warm water port, all of the ports up here are cold, they don't have access to them in the winter. this is key. it's key when those thousands of russian troops moved into crimea, it where they went. >> people will remember this place throughout history. you had famous things happening here as part of its separation, we were talking earlier, florence nightingale. >> that's right, long ties between this part of the world and seems a million miles away in europe. >> the charge of the light brigade back in the 1850s. this went against the wrong front there and it proved very co
will mention ambassador jim warlick and ambassador dobbins who did a great job. so we have a great agreement in place. what is the future with that agreement? it will be difficult. afghanistan faces challenges and, all of us are aware of those challenges but i think the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place? the afghan people have spoken. the afghan presidential candidates, a number of whom i spoke to in kabul when i was there are all in favor of signing the bsa i think it's a virtual certainty the bsa will be signed. the issue whether president karzai signs it or not in my view is irrelevant. we need to plan on effectively him not signing it and move forward. i truly hope that any of the costs ambassador dobbins said might occur if there is delay might be effected by the great planning capacity our agencies have. i don't think there is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the long game as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this topic of the afghan security forces which i not going to be expert i visited afghanistan
freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start with a thank you but i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim and michael o'hanlon. put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out in this but we thought this is such a critical issue as you're trying to follow over the weekend of a lot of people talking about a lot of things that nobody had chance to catch their breath. and have a dialogue. and i think this is an enormous opportunity with three preseason and listen been looking at these issues in studying this part of the world for a long time. to actually have a deep breath and a kind of reasoned, principled discussion about what's happened, what does it mean, where are we going from your and what are our options. i couldn't be more thrilled at these guys are jumping into do this. chris is the executive director at the foreign policy institute. kim holmes is a distinguished fellow, long distance grew not just your heritage but also at the u.s. sta
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